A Place in Two Dimensions: A Selection from Colección Jumex + Fred Sandback


 

“A Place in Two Dimensions: A Selection from Colección Jumex + Fred Sandback” is one of the opening exhibitions of the brand new Museo Jumex. Fundación Jumex’s director Patrick Charpenel selected over fifty pieces from the Jumex Collection as well as seven works by American artist Fred Sandback (1947–2003) to present in gallery 3.

“This curatorial project presents a group exhibition and solo show in the same place and at the same time. Taking into account the possibilities of concepts such as the theory of multiple or parallel universes formulated by quantum physicist Hugh Everett (1930-1982).” -Fundación Jumex Arte Contemporáneo press kit .

The exhibition introduced some of the Jumex collection to those who hadn’t made the trek to Ecatepec to see it at the Jumex juice factory where it was previously housed. The brand new David Chipperfield designed Museum was a great place to show it off. The show was comprised of many international heavy weights whose work was instantly recognizable, contemporary International and Mexican artists and Sandback’s work woven throughout. The mix created a playful display, a large cabinet of curiosities of sorts. One could approach a work that could be of any format  and try to figure it out or just enjoy its color, shape, beauty or strangeness.

As sleek as the museum is, there was a very relaxed feel to the exhibition. It was as if one were walking through a park or a playground, taking in the scenery and occasionally interacting on a swing-set or sitting on a bench to think, observe or read. People were playing with Gabriel Orozco’s holeless oval pool table, (“Carambole with Pendulum”) while Maurizio Cattelan’s double bicycle installation (“Dynamo Secession”, 1997) was almost inviting people to sit and pedal to light up the bulb. Damien Hirst’s encased formaldehyde cow head was casually sitting on the floor and Andy Warhol’s small screenprint of Jackie Kennedy hung in an unassuming manner, blink and you might miss it.  The Fischli and Weiss photographs of balanced household objects (Equilibres, 1984-1986) could be a reason to stand in the hallway for hours trying to take each one in,  and of course everyone wanted a selfie in the reflection of Donald Judd’s “Amber Stack”.

In the midst of all that, Sandback’s sculptures, rounded out the space, some were in the form of thread hanging from the ceiling, the lines framing some viewpoints and blending in with the museum’s architecture. They produced a sort of uniformity throughout hte exhibition, linking everything together.  Their simplicity creating a balance in the smorgasbord of curiosities.

 

Carol Bove: Un Passage Difficile, 2008. (detail). Jumex Collection

 

Carol Bove: Un Passage Difficile, 2008 (detail). Jumex Collection



Daniel Guzman:  The Count of the Days, 2009 (detail). Jumex Collection


Daniel Guzman:  The Count of the Days, 2009 (detail). Jumex Collection

 

Urs Fischer: Addict, 2006. Jumex Collection

 

Photo via Fundación Jumex


Rudolf Stingel: Untitled 2001-2002. Jumex Collection


Donald Judd: Amber Stack, 1987. Jumex Collection

 


Photo via Fundación Jumex


Photo via Fundación Jumex

 

Photo via Fundación Jumex


Fischli & Weiss: Equilibres, 1984-1986 (detail). Jumex Collection

 


Fischli & Weiss: Equilibres, 1984-1986 (detail). Jumex Collection

 

Abraham Cruzvillegas: 1/2 Hour of Punches, 2004. Jumex Collection

For more information read Fundación Jumex’s exhibition guide , press kit and curatorial statement

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