Slavs and Tatars – Presentation House Gallery

 


Slavs and Tatars, Wheat Molla, 2011, wheat, cotton,lue, brick, 45 x 35 x 25 cm. Courtesy Slavs and Tatars and Kraupa-Tuskany Zeidler Galerie, Berlin and the Third Line Gallery, Dubai.

APRIL 12 – MAY 26, 2013
SLAVS AND TATARS
FRIENDSHIP OF NATIONS: POLISH SHI’ITE SHOWBIZ

OPENING RECEPTION, ARTISTS TOUR AND BOOK LAUNCH
THURSDAY APRIL 11, 7PM 

ARTIST LECTURE TUESDAY APRIL 9 AT 7PM AT SFU WOODWARD’S, DJAVAD MOWAFAGHIAN WORLD ART CENTRE, ROOM 2555, 149 WEST HASTINGS STREET

REVERSE JOY LAUNCH WEDNESDAY APRIL 10, 5:30PM AT THE FOUNTAIN IN THE WALL CENTER PLAZA, INTERSECTION OF BURRARD AND NELSON

Presentation House Gallery is pleased to announce Friendship of Nations: Polish Shi’ite Showbiz, the first exhibition in Canada of the artist collective Slavs and Tatars.

Curated by Vancouver-based artist Babak Golkar, Friendship of Nations: Polish Shi’ite Showbiz traces a shared genealogy between Iran and Poland. Beginning as an investigation into the Iranian Revolution of 1979 and the Solidarity movement of 1980 – two key moments that bookend the stories of twenty-first century Islamic modernity and twentieth-century communism, respectively – the project draws on research that stretches from the seventeenth-century Sarmatism of the Polish nobility, to the recent Green movement in Iran. Channeling the folklore and artisanal crafts of both cultures, Slavs and Tatars examine the potential for these modes of production to embody, extend and build upon the ideological impulse of 1979 and 1989 respectively.

In unison with our exhibition, the collective will launch a temporary public art work, titled Reverse Joy, at the plaza in front of the Sheraton Wall Centre. Originally shown in Jerusalem, Reverse Joy involves temporarily dyeing a public fountain.

Slavs and Tatars is a collective devoted to an area east of the former Berlin Wall and west of the Great Wall of China known as Eurasia. The collective’s work spans several media, disciplines, and a broad spectrum of cultural registers (high and low) focusing on an oft-forgotten sphere of influence between Slavs, Caucasians and Central Asians. The members of the collective are based between Paris, Warsaw, New York and Moscow. Slavs and Tatars has published Kidnapping Mountains (Book Works, 2009), Love Me, Love Me Not: Changed Names (onestar press, 2010), Not Moscow Not Mecca (Revolver/Secession, 2012), Khhhhhhh (Mousse/Moravia Gallery, 2012) as well as their translation of the legendary Azeri satire Molla Nasreddin: the magazine that would’ve, could’ve, should’ve (JRP-Ringier, 2011). Their work has been exhibited at the 10th Sharjah, 8th Mercosul, 3rd Thessaloniki, and 9th Gwangju Biennials and Museum of Modern Art, NYC.

http://presentationhousegallery.org/

http://www.slavsandtatars.com/

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